In search of Paramis: The Revolution

Lately I’ve been interested in Buddhism. More of a 2.0 because I was very much into Buddhist philosophy in my teens as well. I’ve been trying to chant 30 min in the morning and evening a la Nicheran Buddhism but I’m not really associated with any specific branch. Reading the Sutras from the Pali cannon is quite inspirational.

The 10 Paramis (or perfections) according to Buddhism are:

-Discernment

-Good will

-Truth

-Virtue

-Relinquishment

-Generosity

-Renunciation

-Calm

-Endurance

-Equinimity

Focus on Generosity: Give like Buddha did

“Having given [a gift], not seeking one’s own profit, not with a mind attached [to the reward], not seeking to store up for oneself, nor [with the thought], ‘I’ll enjoy this after death,’ but with the thought, ‘This is an ornament for the mind, a support for the mind’ — on the break-up of the body, after death, one reappears in the company of Brahma’s Retinue. Then, having exhausted that action, that power, that status, that sovereignty, one is a non-returner and does not come back to this world.”

§48.“One who is generous, a master of giving, is dear & charming to people at large… this is a fruit of generosity visible in the here & now.

“Furthermore, good people, people of integrity, admire one who is generous, a master of giving… this, too, is a fruit of generosity visible in the here & now.

“Furthermore, the fine reputation of one who is generous, a master of giving, is spread far & wide… this, too, is a fruit of generosity visible in the here & now.

“Furthermore, when one who is generous, a master of giving, approaches any assembly of people — noble warriors, brahmans, householders, or contemplatives — he/she does so confidently & without embarrassment… this, too, is a fruit of generosity visible in the here & now.

“Furthermore, at the break-up of the body, after death, one who is generous, a master of giving, reappears in a good destination, the heavenly world… this is a fruit of generosity in the next life.”

§49.Inner wealth, according to the texts, means seven things — conviction, virtue, a sense of conscience, scrupulousness, breadth of learning, generosity, and discernment — but to put it simply, inner wealth refers to the inner quality we build within ourselves. Outer wealth — money and material goods — doesn’t have any hard and fast owners. Today it may be ours, tomorrow someone else may take it away. There are times when it belongs to us, and times when it belongs to others. Even with things that are fixed in the ground, like farms or orchards, you can’t keep them from changing hands.

(material pasted from http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/study/perfections.html#generosity )- a great resource for studying Buddhism

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